7th International Building Physics Conference (IBPC) 2018 Syracuse

  • Conference Call
  • Wel­come to the 7th Inter­na­tional Build­ing Physics Con­fer­ence (IBPC) 2018!

    This con­fer­ence will be jointly orga­nized by Syra­cuse Cen­ter of Excel­lence in Envi­ron­men­tal and Energy Sys­tems, Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing and Com­puter Sci­ence, and School of Archi­tec­ture, Syra­cuse Uni­ver­sity and will be held on Sep­tem­ber 2326, 2018 in Syra­cuse, NY, United States at the Mar­riott Syra­cuse Down­town.

    The theme of IBPC 2018 is “Healthy, Intel­li­gent, and Resilient Build­ings and Urban Envi­ron­ments”. It will pro­vide a forum for sci­en­tific, tech­no­log­i­cal and design exchanges through mul­ti­ple platforms:

    1. pre­sen­ta­tions of orig­i­nal research and devel­op­ment work and findings,
    2. demon­stra­tions and exhi­bi­tions of inno­v­a­tive green build­ing tech­nolo­gies, and
    3. dis­cus­sions of future chal­lenges and opportunities.

    It will cover a wide range of research top­ics cut­ting across mul­ti­ple scales of the built envi­ron­men­tal sys­tems rang­ing from nano-​material appli­ca­tions, to microen­vi­ron­ments around occu­pants, to rooms and whole build­ings, and to neigh­bor­hood and urban scales. The goal of the con­fer­ence is to advance the col­lec­tive under­stand­ing of the nature and behav­ior of the cyber-​physical sys­tems in these dif­fer­ent scales, how they inter­act, and what can be done to opti­mize their design and oper­a­tion for healthy, intel­li­gent and resilient build­ings and urban environments.

    Con­fer­ence Topics

    IBPC 2018 Ses­sions will cover a wide range of research top­ics cat­e­go­rized as fol­lows. Each topic is lead by fac­ulty mem­bers of the orga­niz­ing com­mit­tee who have active research in the topic area. Below is a brief descrip­tion of each topic with exam­ples of research sub­jects for the topic.

    Build­ing Mate­ri­als, Assem­blies, and Enclo­sure Systems

    The build­ing mate­ri­als, assem­blies and enclo­sure sys­tems track will fos­ter research and devel­op­ment from the indus­try and acad­e­mia that inte­grates the prin­ci­ples of build­ing physics in devel­op­ing build­ing mate­ri­als, com­po­nents, and enclo­sure sys­tems (e.g. wall, roof and floor). Research that uti­lizes inno­v­a­tive approaches in bridg­ing between dis­tinct scales, objec­tives, and dis­ci­plines is highly encour­aged to sub­mit. The var­i­ous areas of build­ing physics includ­ing heat, air, mois­ture, sound, and light are within the scope of this track, and issues relat­ing to cli­mate con­trol, indoor envi­ron­ment qual­ity, and envi­ron­men­tal impact are of key interest.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Renew­able bi-​polymer agri­cul­tural by-​products for buildings
    • Dynamic walls (e.g., double-​façade)
    • Hygrother­mal performance
    • Air bar­ri­ers for leak­age and mois­ture control
    • Con­trol­lable nat­ural ventilation
    • Nat­ural light­ing vs. ther­mal mass utilization
    • Green roofs
    • Adap­tive windows
    • Solar heat gain and shading
    • Inte­grated build­ing enve­lope and HVAC systems
    • Build­ings for solar panels

    Green Build­ings, Green Roofs and the Urban Environment

    This track will focus on research and appli­ca­tions of nat­ural and built envi­ron­ment impacts on phys­i­cal con­di­tions of build­ings and the urban envi­ron­ment. Top­ics include spa­tial and tem­po­ral vari­a­tions of urban micro­cli­mate quan­tifi­ca­tion; land­scape ecol­ogy; green roofs; software-​based design for urban plan­ning and meth­ods of enhanc­ing build­ing site selec­tion; build­ing clus­ter arrange­ment and out­door ther­mal comfort.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Green roofs
    • Land­scape archi­tec­ture and urban ecology
    • Urban heat island effect (White and green roof impacts)
    • Extreme wind and the built environment
    • Out­door ther­mal comfort
    • Mod­el­ing mul­ti­ple build­ing and urban energy flows (in and between buildings)
    • Urban form (Tem­po­ral and spa­tial vari­a­tions of urban microclimate)
    • Pol­lu­tant trans­for­ma­tion and trans­port (e.g., change of pol­lu­tant com­po­si­tion or par­ti­cle size distributions)
    • Dis­trict energy systems

    Intel­li­gent Mon­i­tor­ing and Man­age­ment Systems

    Envi­sion an intel­li­gent mon­i­tor­ing and man­age­ment sys­tem for smart build­ings: through sen­sors on the build­ing or sen­sors on a smart­phone and wear­able devices, it col­lects the states of the Per­sonal Envi­ron­ment (PE), (i.e., micro-​environmental con­di­tions, such as tem­per­a­ture, humid­ity, light, etc, around indi­vid­ual occu­pants) and detect occu­pant activ­i­ties (such as tying, eat­ing, doing exer­cises, etc), com­pares with their indi­vid­ual pref­er­ences, and adjusts the build­ing con­trol to meet occu­pants’ envi­ron­men­tal need in the most energy-​efficient and cost-​effective man­ner. This track focuses on advanced sens­ing and con­trol tech­nolo­gies, meth­ods and sys­tems for detect­ing occu­pant activ­i­ties, mon­i­tor­ing build­ings, and man­ag­ing build­ing oper­a­tions intelligently.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Low-​cost sensors
    • Vir­tual sensors”
    • Embed­ded sens­ing and monitoring
    • Sen­sor networks
    • Build­ing energy management
    • Intel­li­gent controls
    • Whole build­ing sys­tem com­mis­sion­ing and diagnosis
    • Mobile sens­ing for low-​energy design strategies
    • Opti­miza­tion of IEQ and energy efficiency
    • Novel build­ing sys­tem testbeds

    Human Fac­tors: Occu­pant Per­cep­tion, Behav­ior, and Impact on Build­ing Performance

    The suc­cess­ful imple­men­ta­tion of high per­form­ing build­ings requires a del­i­cate bal­ance of energy effi­ciency with com­fort­able, healthy indoor envi­ron­ments for build­ing inhab­i­tants.. The human fac­tors track focuses on the rela­tion­ship between peo­ple and their indoor envi­ron­ments. Top­ics may include the impact of human fac­tors on build­ing per­for­mance, mod­el­ing and sim­u­la­tion of occu­pant behav­ior, eval­u­at­ing per­cep­tion and com­fort within indoor envi­ron­ments, phys­i­o­log­i­cal or psy­cho­log­i­cal human fac­tors test­ing, human-​building inter­ac­tion, build­ing con­trol sys­tems for occu­pant com­fort, indi­vid­ual and com­bined effects of indoor envi­ron­men­tal fac­tors, and per­son­al­ized ver­sus shared indoor environments.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Occu­pant – build­ing interactions
    • Respon­sive environments
    • Occu­pant behavior
    • Com­fort (visual, ther­mal and perceptional)
    • Indi­vid­ual and com­bined effects of indoor envi­ron­men­tal (IE) factors
    • Per­son­al­ized vs. shared IE
    • Trade-​off between mul­ti­ple IE factors

    Indoor Envi­ron­men­tal Qual­ity (Air, Ther­mal, Day­light­ing, Arti­fi­cial Light­ing, Acousti­cal, Visual)

    The indoor envi­ron­men­tal qual­ity (IEQ) track pro­vides a forum to exchange knowl­edge and dis­cuss lat­est devel­op­ment in approaches to quan­ti­fy­ing IEQ, phys­i­cal and chem­i­cal processes that impact IEQ and meth­ods and tech­nolo­gies to improve IEQ. Both lab­o­ra­tory and field stud­ies are of inter­est. Stud­ies on inno­v­a­tive approaches to improv­ing IEQ in energy-​efficient and cost-​effective man­ner are espe­cially encouraged.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Ther­mal, acousti­cal, light­ing and air quality
    • Desir­able and thresh­olds vs. actual con­di­tions (his­tor­i­cal, bench­mark­ing and com­pre­hen­sive surveys)
    • Pol­lu­tant sources, sinks and transport
    • Indoor air and sur­face chemistry
    • Day­light­ing
    • Air­borne infec­tious dis­eases trans­mis­sion, con­trol and mitigation
    • Hydro­ponic sys­tems for air purification
    • IAQ in low-​energy buildings
    • Inte­gra­tion of source con­trol, ven­ti­la­tion and air cleaning
    • IEQ in var­i­ous build­ing types (schools, hos­pi­tals, offices, res­i­dences, etc.)

    Envi­ron­men­tal Con­trol Equip­ment and Systems

    This track will dis­cuss the lat­est research and devel­op­ment in indoor envi­ron­men­tal con­trol tech­nolo­gies at both the com­po­nent and sys­tem lev­els and across dif­fer­ent scales from indi­vid­u­als to build­ings. Trend­ing sub­jects in local or per­sonal envi­ron­men­tal con­trol, demand-​based envi­ron­men­tal con­trol, novel energy recov­ery meth­ods, energy-​efficient air purifi­ca­tion approaches, and advanced tech­niques for equip­ment fault detec­tion and diag­no­sis are espe­cially encouraged.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Local ther­mal envi­ron­men­tal control
    • Per­sonal ventilation
    • Room air distribution
    • Multi-​zone build­ing pres­sure and flow balances
    • Inter-​zonal heat, mois­ture and con­t­a­m­i­nant flows
    • Demand-​based ven­ti­la­tion and econ­o­mizer control
    • Per­sonal ven­ti­la­tion and coor­di­na­tion with shared HVAC systems
    • Heat and energy recov­ery ventilator
    • Dehu­mid­i­fi­ca­tion and air conditioning
    • Air clean­ing and fil­tra­tion equipment
    • Equip­ment fault detec­tion and diagnosis
    • Data cen­ter cool­ing and pol­lu­tion control
    • Inte­gra­tion of pas­sive tech­nolo­gies with mechan­i­cal systems

    Mod­el­ing, Sim­u­la­tion and Design Processes

    Built envi­ron­men­tal sys­tems (BES) include trans­port of heat, air, mois­ture, pol­lu­tants and light in multi-​scales rang­ing from the microen­vi­ron­ments around occu­pants to rooms, to build­ings, to the build­ings’ imme­di­ate sur­round­ing envi­ron­ments, and to neigh­bor­hood and city scales. The energy and mass flows across these dif­fer­ent scales play a key role in affect­ing the BES per­for­mance. The abil­ity to model these trans­port processes and sim­u­late their impacts on the BES per­for­mance is essen­tial for the opti­mal design and oper­a­tion of build­ings. This track will cover the lat­est research in com­po­nent model devel­op­ment within indi­vid­ual scales, multi-​scale sys­tem mod­el­ing approaches and tech­niques, build­ing infor­ma­tion mod­el­ing, opti­miza­tion meth­ods and their appli­ca­tion for inte­grated design and build­ing sys­tem controls.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Mod­el­ing multi-​scale built envi­ron­men­tal systems
    • Com­bined heat, air, mois­ture and pol­lu­tant simulations
    • Com­pu­ta­tional fluid dynam­ics (CFDs)
    • Day­light­ing analysis
    • Com­bined and sep­a­rated IEQ and energy simulations
    • Inte­gra­tive design
    • Build­ing infor­ma­tion mod­els (BIM) and databases
    • Multi-​performance objec­tive opti­miza­tion algorithms
    • Build­ing design for disassembly
    • Plu­g­ins vs. stand­alone sim­u­la­tion software
    • Bench­marks for model ver­i­fi­ca­tion and validation

    Inno­v­a­tive Energy and Power Gen­er­a­tion and Management

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Com­bined heat­ing, cool­ing and power
    • Building-​integrated energy and power sys­tems (wind, solar, geothermal)
    • The build­ing as power plant
    • Build­ing energy and ecosystem
    • Exergy
    • Peak demand management

    Pol­icy and Economics

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Energy, envi­ron­men­tal, soci­etal and polit­i­cal factors
    • Green build­ing stan­dards and pol­icy impact
    • Green infra­struc­ture stan­dards and pol­icy impact
    • Life-​cycle analysis
    • Energy plan­ning and management

    Mis­sion Crit­i­cal Envi­ron­men­tal Systems

    This track will focus on the lat­est research and devel­op­ment of envi­ron­ment sys­tems for mis­sion crit­i­cal sys­tems and data cen­ters. Sub­jects include but not lim­ited to demand-​based envi­ron­men­tal con­trol, novel energy recov­ery meth­ods, econ­o­miz­ers for energy effi­cient cool­ing, and energy-​efficient air purifi­ca­tion approaches. Stud­ies on inno­v­a­tive energy effi­cient and cost effec­tive sys­tems along with con­trol­ling tem­per­a­ture, humid­ity, and pol­lu­tants are espe­cially encour­aged. Both lab­o­ra­tory and field stud­ies are of interest.

    Sub­ject Exam­ples:

    • Lat­est code (ASHRAE 90.4 and 90.1) impacts on data cen­ter designs
    • Gaseous pol­lu­tant source and trans­port into a data center
    • Par­tic­u­late pol­lu­tant source and trans­port into a data center
    • Indoor air and sur­face chemistry
    • Inte­gra­tion of source con­trol, ven­ti­la­tion and air cleaning
    • Meth­ods to reduce con­t­a­m­i­nant levels
    • Desir­able and thresh­olds vs. actual con­di­tions (his­tor­i­cal, bench­mark­ing and com­pre­hen­sive surveys)
    • Energy effi­cient sys­tems that use out­side air effectively
    • Con­trol­ling tem­per­a­ture and humidity
    • Con­trol­ling and mea­sur­ing air quality
    • Cost effec­tive designs for main­tain­ing environment
    • Data Cen­ter air distribution
    • Demand-​based ven­ti­la­tion and econ­o­mizer control
    • Inte­gra­tion of pas­sive tech­nolo­gies with mechan­i­cal sys­tems to main­tain the environment

    Con­fer­ence Organisation

    • Chair: Jian­shun “Jensen” Zhang – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Co-​Chairs:
      • Edward Bogucz – Syra­cuseCoE, Syra­cuse University’s Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing and Com­puter Sci­ence, Dept of Mechan­i­cal and Aero­space Engineering
      • Cliff David­son – Envi­ron­men­tal Engi­neer­ing Pro­gram Direc­tor, Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
      • Bess Kri­ete­meyer – School of Archi­tec­ture, Syra­cuse University

    Tech­ni­cal Pro­gram Committee

    • Jeong­min Ahn – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Edward Bogucz – Syra­cuse University’s Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing and Com­puter Sci­ence, Dept. of Mechan­i­cal and Aero­space Engineering
    • Thong Dang – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Cliff David­son – Envi­ron­men­tal Engi­neer­ing Pro­gram Direc­tor, Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Peng Gao – Geog­ra­phy, Maxwell School of Cit­i­zen­ship and Pub­lic Affairs, Syra­cuse University
    • H. Ezzat Khal­ifa – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Bess Kri­ete­meyer – School of Archi­tec­ture, Syra­cuse University
    • Daek­won Park – School of Archi­tec­ture, Syra­cuse University
    • Eric Schiff – Physics, Col­lege of Arts & Sci­ences, Syra­cuse University
    • Roger Schmidt – Syra­cuse University’s Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing and Com­puter Sci­ence, Dept. of Mechan­i­cal and Aero­space Engineering
    • Tim Sten­son – School of Archi­tec­ture, Syra­cuse University
    • Jian Tang – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University
    • Peter Wilcoxen – Maxwell School of Cit­i­zen­ship and Pub­lic Affairs, Syra­cuse University
    • Jian­shun “Jensen” Zhang – Col­lege of Engi­neer­ing & Com­puter Sci­ence, Syra­cuse University

    Inter­na­tional Sci­en­tific Committee

    • Bijan Adl-​Zarrabi – Chalmers Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Sweden
    • Jaku­biec Alstan – Sin­ga­pore Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Singapore
    • Ahu Aydo­gan Akseli – City Col­lege of New York, United States
    • Rachel Becker – Tech­nion Israel Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, Israel
    • Umberto Berard – Ryer­son Uni­ver­sity, Canada
    • Mark Bomberg – Inter­na­tional Jour­nal of Build­ing Physics, Canada
    • Qingyan Chen – Pur­due Uni­ver­sity, United States
    • Dana Cup­cova – Carnegie Mel­lon, United States
    • Mar­tina Decker – New Jer­sey Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, United States
    • Anna Dyson – CASE/​Rensselaer Poly­tech­nic Insti­tute, United States
    • John Grunewald – Dres­den Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Germany
    • Arild Gus­tavsen – Nor­we­gian Uni­ver­sity of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy Trond­heim, Norway
    • Carl-​Eric Hagentoft – Chalmers Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Sweden
    • Fari­borz Haghighat – Con­cor­dia Uni­ver­sity, Canada
    • Shuichi Hokoi – Kyoto Uni­ver­sity, Japan
    • Sture Holm­berg – Stock­holm KTH Royal Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, Sweden
    • Tianzhen Hong – LBNL Berke­ley, United States
    • Roger Hubeli – Syra­cuse Uni­ver­sity, United States
    • Arnold Janssens – Ghent Uni­ver­sity, Belgium
    • Phil Jones – Cardiff Uni­ver­sity, Wales
    • Karel Kabele – CSC Czech Tech­ni­cal Uni­ver­sity in Prague, Czech Republic
    • Shin­suke Kato – Uni­ver­sity of Tokyo, Japan
    • Essam Khalil – Cairo Uni­ver­sity, Egypt
    • Kwang-​Woo Kim – Seoul National Uni­ver­sity, South Korea
    • Tham Kwok Wai – National Uni­ver­sity of Sin­ga­pore, Singapore
    • Nor­ford Les – Mass­a­chu­setts Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, United States
    • Yuguo Li – Uni­ver­sity of Hong Kong, China
    • John Lit­tle – Vir­ginia Tech, United States
    • Mae-​Ling Lokko – Rens­se­laer Poly­tech­nic Institute/​CASE/​NEXUS, United States
    • For­rest Meg­gers – Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity, United States
    • Chris Muller – Purafil, United States
    • Peter V. Nielsen – Aal­borg Uni­ver­sity, Denmark
    • Nick Nov­elli – HeliOp­tix LLC, United States
    • Ryozo Ooka – Uni­ver­sity of Tokyo, Japan
    • Ulrike Passé – Iowa State, United States
    • Marco Perino – Politec­nico di Torino, Italy
    • Ute Poer­schke – Penn­syl­va­nia State Uni­ver­sity, United States
    • Meng­hao Qin – Nan­jing Uni­ver­sity, China
    • Rein­hard Rader­ma­cher – Uni­veristy of Mary­land, United States
    • Christoph Rein­hart – Mass­a­chu­setts Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, United States
    • Carsten Rode – Tech­ni­cal Uni­ver­sity of Den­mark, Denmark
    • Mats San­ta­mouris – Uni­ver­sity of Athens, Greece
    • Henk Schellen – Eind­hoven Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Netherlands
    • Ste­fano Schi­avon – UCBerke­ley, United States
    • Chan­dra Sekhar – National Uni­ver­sity of Sin­ga­pore, Singapore
    • Jeff Siegel – Uni­ver­sity of Toronto, Canada
    • Carey Simon­son – Uni­ver­sity of Saskatchewan, Canada
    • Shane Smith – Uni­ver­sity of Ari­zona, United States
    • Fit­sum Tariku – British Colum­bia Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, Canada
    • Dogan Timur – Cor­nell Uni­ver­sity, United States
    • Paolo Tronville – Politec­nico di Torino, Italy
    • Car­men Trudell – Cal­i­for­nia Poly­tech­nic State, United States
    • Keith Van de Riet – Uni­ver­sity of Kansas, United States
    • Loft­ness Vivian – Carnegie Mel­lon, United States
    • Nina Wil­son – Rens­se­laer Poly­tech­nic Institute/​CASE, United States
    • Hiroshi Yoshino – Tohoku Uni­ver­sity, Japan
    • Andrzej Zarzy­cki – New Jer­sey Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, United States
    • John Zhai – Uni­ver­sity of Col­orado Boul­der, United States
    • Yin­ping Zhang – Tsinghua Uni­ver­sity, China
    • Jip­ing Zhu – Health Canada, Canada

    Con­fer­ence Staff

    • Stacy Bunce — Admin­is­tra­tive Assis­tant, SyracuseCoE
    • Chetna Chi­anese — Abstract and paper review coor­di­na­tor, Asso­ciate Direc­tor of Research, SyracuseCoE
    • Ker­rie Mar­shall — Web­mas­ter, Assis­tant Direc­tor of Com­mu­ni­ca­tions, SyracuseCoE
    • Tammy Rosanio — Over­all Man­ager and Coor­di­na­tor, Asso­ciate Direc­tor of Part­ner Pro­grams, SyracuseCoE

    Timeline

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